The Pain

The Colorado Trail Race is almost three weeks past and since then the world has continued to spin. Nothing has changed for anyone else. But for me and maybe a few others this race is drilled in my head. I can’t stop writing about it, I can’t stop thinking about it, and can’t even stop dreaming about it. In my dreams I keep worrying about someone catching me and passing me. I dream about stubbing my toe on every damn rock in Sargents Mesa. I dream about finishing and how anti-climatic it was, but how the feeling was totally awesome. Anyways I should probably stop talking about it, so this is my last hurrah until next year.
The pain that I endured during the 5 days on my bike has really set me back, as far as getting back on my bike. I have had ridiculous pain in my knees.  From what I’m told my my meniscus is not getting enough blood flow. This happens when muscles around your knee don’t have anywhere to go — which in turn squeezes the veins and cuts blood flow to the meniscus. I’m not quite sure I believe it or not. Ice, arnica, and rest has only recently helped me stop walking like I’m 75.
My achilles tendon, which creaks like an old rocking chair, has continued to do so, on and off for a good part of a year now. It’s fine when I don’t hike my bike, but I tend to put myself in dumb situations like climbing Block and Tackle Trail, up Brush Creek Road near Crested Butte, or entering the CTR for that matter. Still rest, stretching, and yoga have yet to cure my ailing achilles.
My hands, ohhhh boy. After the Arizona Trail Race I experienced numbness caused by entrapment of the Ulnar nerve. What I understand is that this is very common for many racers participating in long multi-day races. Slowly the numbness went away with a few hand exercises I was told to do — but be warned it’s no fast fix. For the Colorado Trail Race, I experienced the same thing, but this time, it feels like I’m recovering from a broken wrist. The motion in my right wrist is far worse than the left. The strength in my fingers is very weak, especially my middle three fingers. To top it off, my pointer finger is bent, mimicking the position of gripping my break (this is kinda funny looking).
My toes were absolutely crushed, especially in the Sargents Mesa section. My bike shoes have too big of a toe box creating lots of movement. They also have very little stiffness and protection near the toe. Those two elements have killed both my right and left big toe nails. Also, the CTR created a wicked blister on my left big toe that had finally stopped pussing a week ago. Oh and the big toes are also numb.
Last but not least, I can’t remember eating so much food in a two week period ever in my life. The cravings I am having for junk food are way over the top. Gummy Bears, Skittles, Sour Patch Kids, Butterfingers……..Yum. Then you add Ice cream into the mix, Third Bowl has seen me far too often, Ice cream cookie sandwiches taste far to good for the price I get them for, and I can’t even stop eating home made shakes, which in turn keep me up all night because I’m so damn full. The cravings have slowly stopped. Luckily, because it was starting to really put a dent in my already small bank account.
All of this hardship you think would have me never considering a bikepacking race again. I told myself, “no way in hell am I ever doing this again” when I was on the trail. I’m not sure if it’s just me or what, but I seem to just block out and forget the bad times. Fortunately or unfortunately, the reward of such a race is so great, there is no stopping my inner drive from doing the Arizona or Colorado Trail Races next year. At some point throughout the winter, I’m sure I will heal up and be ready to go at it again, thats the beauty of time. You would think being a bit younger, your body would heal up faster? But thinking about it, the strongest riders are in the 30’s or 40’s and maybe their bodies have already gone through such agony that ‘The Pain’ is second nature. At any rate, I can’t wait feel normal on my bike again!

3 thoughts on “The Pain

  1. Don't accept that the pain is part it. You have to figure out what caused it and try minimize it occurring again or you won't be doing this in your 40s. This year I've got two numb toes and I'm really not sure were that's coming from, something new. I could lecture you on diet as well but people love their junk food. It's a case of once you start, you can't stop, but if you don't start, you don't need it.

  2. Pingback: Minnesota on my mind. | Neil Beltchenko

  3. Pingback: Neil and his racing adventures | Trails and Tours

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s